Posted by & filed under Member Publications.

The (randomly) selected focus publication for April 2019 is:

Sheeran, N., Jones, L., Rowe, J, & McDonald. (2018). Adolescent mothers’ experiences over time. Family Relations, 67(3), 428-443. doi:10.1111/fare.12312.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine patterns and trajectories for Australian adolescent mothers as they transition into adulthood. Background: Adolescent mothers have diverse outcomes; some experience multiple negative outcomes for themselves and their children, and others prosper. Little is known about the experience over time for adolescent mothers and what factors affect their trajectories. Method: Three exemplar women’s stories are presented as case studies, showcasing themes identified from in-depth interviews conducted with 10 women who gave birth as adolescents. Interviews were conducted at the time of infant birth, as well as 3 months, 12 months, and 5 years later. Results: Two themes emerged that captured the nuanced experiences of these adolescent mothers: stability to chaos and I’ve grown, but I can’t reach the stars. Stability in the areas of family, relationships, geography, and planning/routine were related to whether young women had sufficient resources to focus on their own growth. Conclusion: An adolescent mother’s functioning is related to the extent to which she experiences stability across a number of key domains, which in turn act to limit or enable growth and development. Implications: Adolescent mothers are a heterogeneous group. Targeted assessments and interventions are needed that address disadvantage and promote stability.

A PDF of this article can be accessed here.

Posted by & filed under Member Publications.

We are pleased to announce the publication of a new book by Mark Fifer Seilhamer entitled Gender, Neoliberalism and Distinction Through Linguistic Capital: Taiwanese Narratives of Struggle and Strategy. The book presents the narratives of four Taiwanese young women, all proficient in English, set against the background of the dynamics of multilingualism in Taiwan. It chronicles their strategies and struggles when utilizing cultural goods – in this case their linguistic resources – to differentiate themselves within Taiwanese society.

For more information, take a look at this flyer.

For a limited time, Multilingual Matters is offering a 75% discount on the book using the discount code below.

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The (randomly) selected focus publication for March 2019 is:

Joyce, N., & Harwood, J. (2018). Social identity motivations and intergroup media attractiveness. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations. doi:10.1177/1368430217751629

ABSTRACT

In this experiment we manipulated three features (intergroup social comparison, outgroup character stereotypicality, intergroup intimacy) of an intergroup TV pilot proposal. We examined how two underlying social identity motivations (social enhancement, social uncertainty reduction) were gratified by the aforementioned features, and whether this gratification predicted media attractiveness. Findings indicate that when social comparison was manipulated to advantage the ingroup, intergroup media gratified existing social enhancement motivations and led to audiences rating the show as more entertaining and attractive. This finding was most clearly evident in the absence of intergroup romance. The gratification of social uncertainty reduction motivations was also shown to increase audience perceptions of intergroup media attractiveness, but outgroup stereotypicality was weakly associated with the gratification of this motivation. These results are discussed in terms of both theoretical implications as well as applications to media campaigns.

A PDF of this article can be accessed here.

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The (randomly) selected focus publication for February 2019 is:

Lew, Z., Walther, J. B., Pang, A., & Shin, W. (2018). Interactivity in online chat: Conversational contingency and response latency in computer-mediated communication. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 23, 201-221

ABSTRACT

In dyadic online chats with customers, agents commonly employ scripted responses and converse with several customers simultaneously in order to enhance efficiency. These techniques, however, can affect dimensions of interactivity—conversational contingency and response latency—undermining interpersonal assessments, satisfaction, and organizations’ relationships with customers. This research incorporates aspects of interactivity to the social information processing (SIP) theory of computer-mediated communication, that addresses conversational behaviors that affect interpersonal relations in the absence of nonverbal cues. In a 2 × 2 between-subjects experiment, observers watched one of four versions of a dialogue between a customer and sales support agent, which differed with respect to the agent’s response latency and conversational contingency. Results confirmed deleterious effects of non-contingency on outcomes. Contingency moderated latency effects. Mediation analyses showed indirect effects of contingency via interpersonal judgments on organization/customer relations. Implications for a more comprehensive approach to SIP conclude the study.

A PDF of this article can be accessed here.